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Design and Technology

‘Challenging minds, making a difference’

The Department promotes Design & Technology as an education for all and not just the talented few, concentrating on the importance of thinking skills in tandem with practical experiences.

Students learn to intervene creatively to improve the quality of life through the development of their own ideas and the making of quality products. The development of Key Skills is now widely acknowledged as invaluable for the future and by designing we are able to develop these through problem solving activities with a relevant and applied approach, drawing upon a students’ knowledge base from across the curriculum to create new and exciting products.

We strive to maintain an environment that will inspire students to design and innovate, an experience which hopefully they can enjoy ….we certainly do !

Facilities

The Design & Technology Department enjoys state of the art facilities within a Design Centre that is partly shared with Victoria College. The Centre was designed to provide a harmonious and integrated working relationship between creative subjects and currently accommodates Design Technology, Home Economics, Textiles, Photography and Art.

Design Technology  areas include 2 Graphics Rooms and 2 Multi Media Workshops that have been equipped with the latest computer technology to compliment the more traditional machines and equipment.

Year 7

1 hour per week

The Design & Technology Department at Jersey College for Girls provides a learning environment for the benefit of all students, with the central aim to develop design skills that will aid every individual, whatever their course through life.

This learning journey starts in Year 7 where the Department actively encourages experimentation in design work, exploring possible routes forward through their own ideas to create very original products.

Year 7 project work starts with an introduction to designing,  followed by two major projects, design and make an ‘Electronic Key Fob’ during the spring term followed by a laminated ‘Mobile Phone Holder’ in the summer term.
Both projects revolve around the learning of key skills related to the subject.
Graphical skills for designing and instructional training on tools and machinery are essential for the creation of successful products.

Evaluating the success of your prototype is an important part of the learning process.
All students learn valuable skills in designing and making, using our state of the art facilities that will aid them in their challenging project work.

Above all, students at JCG seem to enjoy the challenging nature of design work which has resulted in a remarkable range of achievements over the past few years.

As well as outstanding examination results at all levels, for the past four years JCG students have secured national scholarships for their work in Design & Technology . . . . . the road starts here !

Year 8

1 hour per week 

Project One : Copper Tea Light Holder & Packaging

Project Two : Dusk Light

The main aim of this assignment is for pupils to apply and combine their understanding of mechanisms, levers and linkages when designing and making.

Pupils will tackle a Design and Make Assignment (DMA) on the theme of ‘Automata’ in which they will develop a product made from timber that is suitable for use as a child’s toy. They should be able to communicate and develop their own ideas based on an existing story or legend and interpret these through mechanical outcomes.

Each pupil should gain the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through investigation, product evaluation and practical tasks.

They will :

  • Use simple models and mock-ups to evaluate design ideas.
  • Be aware that mechanisms can be used to gain a mechanical advantage
  • Take account of technical requirements needed to make the product including standard joining techniques and protective coatings.
  • Use processes, tool, equipment and techniques to make the product with some precision.
  • Consolidate their knowledge and skill related to the use of specified hand-tools and machinery to cut and join materials safely.
Year 9

1 hour per week

Project One : Architectural Challenge

The main aim of this assignment is for pupils to learn how professional designers tackle and create effective environments for the disabled and those with special needs.

Pupils will tackle the project based on the theme of ‘Sheltered Accommodation’ in which they will develop an environment based on the specific needs of individuals. They should be able to work collaboratively as a design team to investigate and create suitable design solutions.

Each pupil should gain the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through investigation, product evaluation and practical tasks.

They will :

  • Use primary and secondary sources of information including appropriate databases to inform design decisions.
  • Be aware of the needs of others, taking into account specific details related to accessible, adaptable and universal aspects of design for those with special needs.
  • Produce accurate 2-D plans to communicate design to others.
  • Use the professional computer aided design programme ArchiCad to create 3D images.
  • Use processes, tool, equipment and techniques to create effective presentation models

Project Two: MP3 Player

The main aim of this assignment is for pupils to learn how to effectively create a usable product of quality using an amplifier circuit.

Pupils will tackle a Design and Make Assignment (DMA) on the theme of MP3 Players in which they will develop a product that incorporates and uses electronic circuitry for a practical purpose. They should be able to create a product concept which is both fit for its intended use and marketable.

Each pupil should gain the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to carry out the DMA successfully through investigation, product evaluation and practical tasks.

They will :

  • Be aware that products can be styled and fashioned to create a market or demand
  • Take account of technical requirements needed to make the product including electronic circuits.
  • Use processes, tool, equipment and techniques to make the product with some precision.

Learn how manufacturing processes such as vacuum forming and blow moulding can be used for Volume production.

GCSE

JCG Design students enjoy the challenging nature of design work which has resulted in a remarkable range of achievements over the past few years.

As well as outstanding examination results at all levels, for the past four years JCG students have secured national scholarships for their work in Design & Technology at GCSE level.


Year 10

2 hours per week

The new linear GCSE course consists of two components, taught over two years. Assessment takes place at the end of the course in the Summer exam session of each year. This fresh approach to the subject maintains the focus on designing and making innovative products which the students enjoy, whilst also increasing the academic content that underpins successful design and engineering. Applied Mathematics and Science based content will be integral to any project based work or exam paper questions.

Generic design factors to be studied:

  • Materials & Properties
  • Manufacturing & Production
  • Digital Technologies
  • Ergonomics & Anthropometrics
  • Environmental Considerations
  • Social & Moral Impact of Design
  • Global Manufacturing & Economics
  • Fashion, Style & Obsolescence
  • Systems & Control
  • Mechanisms & Forces
  • Health & Safety—BSI, COSHH etc.
  • Advertising & Marketing

Year 11

3 hours per week

Non-Examination Assessment     Design, Make & Evaluate Project      50%        40 hours

The NEA requires learners to undertake a substantial design, make and evaluate project centred on the iterative processes of explore, create and evaluate. A broad theme for this project will be released by the exam board on June 1st, candidates will then investigate and  identify a design brief of their own choice within the theme and create a portfolio of evidence to demonstrate their competence.

Principles of  Product Design     Written exam  paper   50%       2 hours

This paper brings together the candidates ‘core’ and ‘in-depth’ knowledge and understanding of product design, in a two section written paper.

‘Core’ knowledge of Design & Technology demonstrates the candidates’ broad understanding of the main principles across the subject (Ref. list left).

‘In-depth’ knowledge allows the candidate to focus more directly on at least one material category from Woods, Metals and Plastics.

Alevel

Year 12

5 hours per week

The new linear A Level course consists of three units, taught over two years. Assessment of all three will take place in the Summer of 2020. This fresh approach to the subject maintains the focus on the designing and making activities that the students enjoy, whilst also increasing the academic content that underpins successful design and engineering. Applied Mathematics and Science based content will be integral to any project based work or exam.

Generic design factors to be studied:

  • Materials & Properties
  • Manufacturing & Production
  • Digital Technologies
  • Ergonomics & Anthropometrics
  • Environmental Considerations
  • Social & Moral Impact of Design
  • Global Manufacturing & Economics
  • Fashion, Style & Obsolescence
  • Systems & Control
  • Mechanisms & Forces
  • Health & Safety—BSI, COSHH etc.
  • Advertising & Marketing

London Trip

Year 12 Design students have the opportunity to visit the City of London to broaden their knowledge and enhance their design experiences. A typical three day excursion includes visits to the Science and Design Museums, Tate Modern and Saatchi Galleries, and even a guided tour of the new Olympic Arena site.


Year 13

5 hours per week

Unit1 Principles of Product Design exam  25%

This paper is set out through four sets of questions that predominantly cover technical principles within each endorsed title  · analyse existing products · demonstrate applied mathematical skills · demonstrate their technical knowledge of materials, product functionality, manufacturing processes and techniques · demonstrate their understanding of wider social, moral and environmental issues that impact on the design and manufacturing industries.

Unit 2    Problem Solving in Product Design exam 25%

This component has two sections that respond to selected tasks. · Section A focuses on learners applying their knowledge, understanding and skills of designing and manufacturing prototypes and products. · Section B requires learners to reflect on their design task in Section A in relation to wider factors/issues from the design principles

Unit 3  Iterative Design Project-  NEA

Non-Examined Assessment

Design & make project 50%         45 hours

The NEA  ‘Iterative Design Project’ requires learners to undertake a substantial design, make and evaluate project centred on the iterative processes of explore, create and evaluate. Learners identify a design opportunity or problem from a context of their own choice, and create a portfolio of evidence in real time through the project to demonstrate their competence.

Arkwright Scholarships

Over the past decade, twelve Design & Technology students from JCG have been awarded prestigious National Scholarships by the Arkwright Trust.

The Arkwright Trust was created to encourage bright young designers into engineering based careers.

In February, students are required to complete the Arkwright Aptitude Paper along with around 800 applicants from across the UK. Only 170 successful candidates then go on to receive scholarships later in the year. A suitable sponsor from Industry or a Charitable Trust will be chosen in line with the students future career aspirations.

Whilst this award clearly proves our students’ talent and flair for Design, it is also reflects their outstanding academic ability and talent across the whole curriculum.