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Upper School Exams 2019

Time Tables

Year 9
Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5

Monday 13th May 9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Drama
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : Revise
91B : Maths
91J : Maths
92A : Maths
92G : Maths
92L : Maths
93W : Maths
9A1 : Physics
9A2 : Physics
9A3 : Physics
9B1 : Physics
9B2 : Physics
9A1 : CS
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : Music
9A1 : Drama
9A2 : CS
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : PE
9B2 : PE

Tuesday 14th May 9A1 : DT
9A2 : DT
9A3 : DT
9B1 : DT
9B2 : DT
9A1 : Food & Nutrition
9A2 : Food & Nutrition
9A3 : Food & Nutrition
9B1 : Food & Nutrition
9B2 : Food & Nutrition
9A1 : PE
9A2 : PE
9A3 : PE
9B1 : CS
9B2 : Revise
9A1 : RS
9A2 : Music
9A3 : Drama
9B1 : RS
9B2 : RS
9A1 : Music
9A2 : RS
9A3 : RS
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : CS

Friday 17th May 9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : Art
9B1 : Drama
9B2 : Revise
9A1 : Geography
9A2 : Geography
9A3 : Geography
9B1 : Geography
9B2 : Geography
91B : Maths
91J : Maths
92A : Maths
92G : Maths
92L : Maths
93W : Maths
9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : Revise
9A1 : History
9A2 : History
9A3 : History
9B1 : History
9B2 : History

Monday 20th May 9A1 : PE
9A2 : PE
9A3 : PE
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : Revise
9A1 : Biology
9A2 : Biology
9A3 : Biology
9B1 : Biology
9B2 : Biology
9A1 : French
9A2 : French
9A3 : French
9B1 : French
9B2 : French
9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : Art
9B2 : Drama
9A1 : English
9A2 : English
9A3 : English
9B1 : English
9B2 : English

Friday 24th May 9A1 : Chemistry
9A2 : Chemistry
9A3 : Chemistry
9B1 : Chemistry
9B2 : Chemistry
9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Art
9A3 : Music
9B1 : PE
9B2 : PE
9A1 : Revise
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : CS
9B1 : Music
9B2 : Art
9A1 : Art
9A2 : Revise
9A3 : Revise
9B1 : Revise
9B2 : Revise
9A1 : Italian
9A2 : Spanish
9A3 : Spanish
9B1 : Italian
9B2 : Spanish
Year 10
0830 0845 0900 0915 0930 0945 1000 1015 1030 1045 1100 1115 1130 1145 1200 1215 1230 1245 1300 1315 1330 1345 1400 1415 1430 1445 1500 1515

Monday 13th May Maths : Paper 1 - 45 mins Geography - 1 hour Religious Studies - 1 hour 30 min
Computer Science - 1 hour

Tuesday 14th May Spanish Writing - 1 hour 15 mins Spanish Reading - 1 hour Maths : Paper 2 - 45 mins Chemistry - 1 hour 30 mins
Italian Writing - 1 hour 15 mins Italian Reading - 1 hour
Computer Science - 1 hour

Friday 17th May French Writing - 1 hour 15 mins French Reading - 1 hour Physical Education - 1 hour 15 min Biology - 1 hour 30 mins
Music - 1 hour 45 min

Monday 20th May History - 1 hour 45 mins Design Technology - 1 hour 45 mins Maths : Paper 3 - 45 mins

Friday 24th May Food and Nutrition - 1 hour 45 mins Drama - 1 hour 45 mins Physics - 1 hour 30 mins

Year 9 Revision

Computer Science

Computing exam = 1 Practical assessment + 1 Theory paper

Practical Exam – 20 mins on TurtleStitch:
Practice your skills:

Look over turtlestitch again and make sure you can remember how to draw certain shapes e.g. square, triangle, rectangle, circle, how to add text
 

Theory Exam – Use your notes, programs and Sharepoint to revise. The exam covers the work of 3 terms in Computing:
Go over these topics:

  1. Internet Safety                                     2. Apps
  2. Logic Gates                         4. TurtleStitch code
  3. Programming terms

Key Words & Notes
Algorithm: A set of instructions followed in sequence to achieve a result.
Variable: Holds or stores a value that can be used in a program.
Sequence: Set of instructions that are followed in a particular order.

Loop: Set of instructions that are repeated a certain number of times.

Iteration: Each time we go round the loop.
Study hard & good Luck!

Ms Powell

Italian

Italian Year 9 Summer Term Revision List

Your end of year exam will have three questions:

  • A photo description task , where you will need to write four sentences describing the photo
  • A writing task of around 80 words
  • Five short translation sentences into Italian
  • A translation of a short passage into English

You should revise the following things:

  • Free time
  • Describing people in photos
  • Shop vocabulary
  • At the doctor’s vocabulary
  • Talking about holidays
  • Giving opinions and justifying them
  • Present tense
  • Past tense
  • Simple future tense (vado a mangiare / giocare / guardare etc = I’m going to eat/play/watch etc)

ALL REVISION WORK CARRIED OUT IN CLASS THIS TERM/ FOR HOMEWORK WILL BE VERY USEFUL FOR THIS ASSESSMENT.

Physics
Spanish

Year 9 Spanish Summer Term Revision List 2019

Your end of year exam will contain five sections:

  1. A photo description task, where you will need to write four sentences describing the photo
  2. Grammar
  3. Five short translation sentences into Spanish
  4. Five short translation sentences into English
  5. A writing task of 80-100 words

You should revise the following areas:

  • How to tell/write the Time in Spanish – eg: it is half past two: son las dos y media
  • Spelling of Numbers – for the time
  • How to write about different types of Weather
  • Writing about Where you live
  • Writing about Free-time activities in the Past tense
  • Writing about Future plans
  • Opinions in Spanish (in present, past and future) with reasons

Grammar:

  • Spelling
  • Spanish Adjectives – rules of agreement (masculine/feminine/singular/plural) and word order
  • Frequency words
  • Accents
  • Present tense
  • Past tense
  • Near Future tense

 

 

 

 

French

What to revise for the end of year assessment?

You will be tested on the following topics:

TOPIC (Allez 2) VOCABULARY LIST
       Festivals        UNIT 6 p.111
       Healthy lifestyles        UNIT 5 p.93
       Family Relationships / Pocket Money        UNIT 4 p.75
       Peer pressure        UNIT 4 p.75
       Past (passé composé = perfect tense or imparfait = imperfect tense) and Future (le futur) tenses        GRAMMAR SECTION p.129

 

Log in to Kerboodle and go to the digital book – Allez 2 or use your own copy

GRAMMAR ALLEZ 2 Extra Practice
Family Relationships Unit 4 Extra Practice
       Expressing opinions, agreeing and disagreeing        p.58
       Pronouns me, te & se in positive & negative statements        p.59 (p.166/168)
Pocket Money
       Numbers        p.60
       Modal Verbs + infinitive (devoir / pouvoir / vouloir)        p.61 (p.167/170)        p.68 ex.1
       Imperfect Tense        p.68 ex.2
       Family Relationships & Pocket Money Reading Practice        p.70 ex.1+2+4 / p.74 ex.3
Healthy living
       Impersonal structures        p. 76
       Pronoun ‘en’        P.78        P.86, exc 1
       Perfect tense with AVOIR        P.80        P.86, exc 2
       Expressions of quantity        P.81
       Future tense        P.82/84        P.169-170, p.87, exc 4
Festivals
       Perfect tense with être        P.98, 168-170        P.104, exc 1
       Perfect or imperfect        P.99, 168-170
       Near future        P.105

 

Skills

During the exam, there will be a reading section and a writing section covering the above topics.

Structure your revision

  1. Learn vocabulary for each of the topics above by following these techniques
  • Quizlet
  • Create flashcards and ask someone to test you
  • Put post-it notes around your room of difficult vocabulary that is not sticking
  1. Complete practice reading exercises
  • Look over and complete reading texts from your text book linked to the above topics (Units 4-6)
  • Complete the Extra Star/Plus activities at the end of each topic unit
  • Practise translating the texts into English
  1. Revise past and future tenses
  • Learn phrases in the past (perfect & imperfect) and future tense under the topic of holidays
  • Use languagesonline.org.uk to revise understanding

 

The writing question will be assessed out of 15 using the following criteria:-

Points Content

 

Range of language Accuracy
5 ·     Full coverage of bullet points.

·     Consistently goes beyond minimum, introducing detail and interest.

·     Communication is clear and unambiguous.

·     Very wide range of familiar and unfamiliar vocabulary and expression and little repetition.

·     Very wide range of grammatical structures which add interest and variety.

·     Use of more than one time frame.

·     High level of accuracy.

·     Some errors in more complex sentences.

·     Verbs, tense formations and time frames secure.

To achieve a Grade 5, you need to accomplish the following in your writing:-

  • I can convey simple messages without ambiguity
  • I can develop longer sentences, using a range of connectives
  • I can convey a lot of information
  • The intended meaning of my writing is nearly always clear
  • I can express opinions, some of which are explained
  • I can write with a variety of appropriate vocabulary
  • I can communicate in past, present and future time frames, mostly with success
  • Errors are mainly minor, with more serious errors in complex structures and sentences
  • My style and register are appropriate
Food and Nutrition

This year you will be completing a multiple choice question exam paper for your summative assessment. Using the completed worksheets notes in your Food & Nutrition folder, and your ‘Vitamins & Minerals’ project, please start to revise the following topics in preparation for your end of Yr 9 test.

  • Rules for Health & Safety in the Food Room.
  • Be able to explain the concept of a ‘balanced diet’.
  • Proteins, Fats and Carbohydrates- make sure you know which foods contain these nutrients and what the role of these nutrients is in your diet.
  • Know why we need to have vitamins and minerals in our diet. Revise Vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K. Revise Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Fluoride, Phosphorus and Iodine (You will need to know the functions (job), sources (where we can find them) and the problems associated with not having enough, or having too much, of these vitamins and minerals in our diet.
  • Know the role of fibre and water in our diet.
  • Be able to explain the Eatwell Plate and the nutrients contained in each section- know how many portions we should ideally eat from each section daily.
  • Be able to suggest ways we can cut down on fat, salt and sugar in recipes.
  • Know the benefits of using local produce.
  • Know which illnesses are associated with a high or low intake of certain nutrients.
  • Be able to explain various baking techniques- e.g. ‘rubbing in’, melting and creaming.
  • Be able to suggest nutritious balanced meals for different groups in the population.
  • Revise Coeliac disease, Coronary Heart disease, Vegetarianism, Anaemia and Lactose Intolerance.
Maths
Chemistry
History

Shaping the Nation: Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day

Students will study the importance of the following factors:

• war

• superstition and religion

• chance

• government

 

• communication

• science and technology

• the role of the individual in encouraging or inhibiting change.

 

This option focuses on the following questions:

  • Why has there been progress in the health of the British people?
  • How and why has the pace and scale of medical development varied at different times?
  • What impact has medical progress had on people and society?
  • How and why have different factors been more important than others for individual medical

developments?

  • What is the significance of key individuals or events in the history of medical development?

 

Part one: Medicine stands still

 

Medieval medicine:

·       approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments

·        the medieval doctor

·        training, beliefs about cause of illness.

Notes? Revised?
 Medical progress:

·       the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment;

·       hospitals

·       the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery

·       surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques.

Public health in the Middle Ages:

·       towns and monasteries

·       the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention.

Part two: The beginnings of change

 

The impact of the Renaissance on Britain:

·       challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery

·       the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey

·       opposition to change

Notes? Revised?
Dealing with disease:

·       traditional and new methods of treatments

·       quackery

·       methods of treating disease

·        plague

·       the growth of hospitals

·       changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians

·       the work of John Hunter.

Prevention of disease:

·       inoculation

·       Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.

Part three: A revolution in medicine

 

The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain:

·       The importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting;

·       Pasteur and vaccination;

·        Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets

·       everyday medical treatments and remedies

Notes? Revised?
Improvements in public health:

·       public health problems in industrial Britain

·       cholera epidemics

·       the role of public health reformers

·       local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts

A revolution in surgery:

·       anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform

·       antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures

·       aseptic surgery

 

Part four: Modern Medicine
20th century Surgery

·       X-rays

·       Blood Transfusions

·       Penicillin

·       Plastic Surgery – Gillies and McIndoe

·       Transplant surgery – Christiaan Barnard

·       Improved anaesthetics

·       Keyhole and micro-surgery

To Be Completed – end of April 2019

 

  • How useful is source…?

Source will be written or visual. Students will need to use the content, provenance and their contextual knowledge in order to evaluate the usefulness of the source. It will target a key event, development, individual or group. Useful/Limitations/Provenance [8 marks] 10 mins

2) Explain the significance of...

It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and specifically assesses the concept of significance. Significance looks at the importance of a key event, person/group or development at the time and importance over time. You must reference two aspects of significance such as short term/ long term, correctness, longevity, impact, consequences. [8 marks] 10 mins

3) Essay question using factors; Judgment on relative importance of an event/person against other factors.

Must show balanced explanation and supported evaluation.  It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and developments over time. It will ask students to evaluate one stated factor against other factors. Factors could include war, religion, chance, government, communication, science and technology or the role of an individual. This will be an essay question requiring a judgement. It is an extended response which requires you to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning which is coherent, relevant, substantiated and logically structured. Marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) will also be available. Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc. [16 marks] + 4SPaG  25 minutes

Religion, Ethics and Philosophy

What will your exam be like?

Questions will test

  • your knowledge of the course this year
  • your understanding of religious, ethical and philosophical ideas
  • your ability to evaluate and produce an argument.

 

There will be some short questions – look at how many marks you are being given for each question and how many points you are asked to write.

There will be one longer answer evaluation question. You must write in paragraphs, write from a variety of viewpoints and reach a conclusion.

Content – What you need to know!

How people make ethical decisions:

Sources of authority

How Christians make ethical decisions

  • Interpreting the Bible
  • Ten Commandments
  • Love your Neighbour

How Buddhists make ethical decisions

  •  The Dalai Lama
  •  The Five Precepts

How should we treat animals?

  •  Vegetarianism

When is it right to go to war?

  •  Just war theory

Human Rights

  • Why do we have rights?
  • Prejudice and discrimination
  • The Holocaust
  • Hate Crime

If there is anything you are not sure about – ask your teacher

 

 

English

In addition to the Essential Grammar Knowledge, you should revise the Key Knowledge identified below; this Key Knowledge relates to each of the topics you have studied so far this year. If you are unsure about any of this material, please check your exercise book and class notes first, and then ask your teacher.  The End of Year Exam will consist of short questions, designed to test your understanding of the Key Knowledge that we want you to take into next year and beyond.

Year Group: 9

Term:  Autumn 2

Title of SOL:  Women in 19th Century / Victorian Literature (includes non-fiction research)

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Language devices: personification, unreliable narrator, narrative voice,  antithesis, dramatic irony, epistolary work of fiction, foreshadowing, motifs, protagonist, situational irony, symbolism, verbal irony

·       Victorian context: patriarchy, the angel in the house, paternalistic culture, the subordination of women in marriage.

 

Year Group: 9

Term:  Autumn 1

Title of SOL: Modern Drama with Media Focus: Text and Film (An Inspector Calls)

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Drama concepts: 3 act ‘well-made play’ ( involving a tight plot and a climax that takes place close to the end of the play); conflict and change; significance of stage directions;

·       An Inspector Calls: capitalism; socialism; social class and workers; responsibility; hypocrisy; generational conflict; gender

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

·       Additional terminology: mouthpiece; monologue; dramatic irony; props; repetition; pace; entrances and exits; interruptions; euphemisms

 

Year Group: 9

Term: Spring 1

Title of SOL: Poetry Comparison

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Romanticism (including celebration of the natural world and the power of imagination)

·       Concept of a pattern of imagery (e.g. natural imagery, religious imagery);

·       Themes (explored across multiple poems)

·       Concept of poetic form (e.g. sonnet, dramatic monologue)

·       Concept and examples of different types of historical context (literary context, social and political context, biographical context)

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

Poetic terminology: irony; rhyme scheme; dramatic monologue; enjambment; caesura; speaker; simile; metaphor; personification; pronouns; onomatopoeia; alliteration; assonance; stanza; colloquial; antithesis; juxtaposition; rhythm (and various words and phrases for describing rhythm); tone (and various words for describing tone)

 

Year Group:  9

Term: Spring 2 and Summer 1

Title of SOL: War Writing  - Writing Focused SOL

Key knowledge/concepts:

 Awareness of major World War I poets, e.g. Wilfred Owen

Concepts for war literature: death and loss; satire; attitudes to the enemy; love; patriotism; camaraderie and friendship; the physical and psychological effects of battle

 

Year 9 Key Knowledge Retrieval Practice

0.71978684 What is meant by the term 'well made play'?
0.57569908 What does it mean to say a character is an author's mouthpiece?
0.87247189 What is a euphemism?
0.49144085 What is capitalism?
0.34603985 What is socialism?
0.08521187 What is hypocrisy?
0.08524303 What is meant by generational conflict?
0.17945198 What do semi-colons separate?
0.56307812 What is an unreliable narrator?
0.33269154 What is antithesis?
0.06523309 What is epistolary fiction?
0.28162263 Name three types of irony
0.12583979 What is meany by patriarchy?
0.75268326 What did Victorians mean  by 'the angel in the house'?
0.48450892 Give an example of symbolism from a text you've studied
0.37810322 What is personification?
0.25193297 Identify at least two features of Romanticism
0.62976039 What Is meant by the term a 'pattern of imagery'
0.04125841 Give two examples of themes in two different texts you have studied
0.44953137 How many lines does a sonnet have?
0.62229309 What is a dramatic monologue?
0.98266941 What do we mean by biographical context?
0.27421568 What is caesura?
0.70198156 What is antithesis?
0.01040924 What do we mean by tone?
0.4761733 What is patriotism?
0.01402683 What does camaraderie mean?
0.4067662 What is a satire?
0.90048908 What is a noun?
0.33823522 What is a dependent or subordinate clause?
0.3248876 During' is a preposition of…?
0.09485501 For what purpose do we use a semi-colon?

Essential Grammar Knowledge for Years 7, 8 and 9

Geography

Revision list for Year 9 end of year exam- Geographical hazards

Volcanoes-

  1. What is a volcano?
  2. What is the distribution of volcanoes?
  3. What are the different types of volcano?
  4. How do you measure them?
  5. How can you predict them?
  6. What are the characteristics/parts of volcanoes?
  7. Why do you get tectonic hazards?
  8. What is the difference between a risk and a hazard?
  9. How do you do hazard risk assessments?

Earthquakes-

  1. What is an earthquake?
  2. What is the distribution of earthquakes?
  3. How do we measure earthquakes?
  4. How do we predict earthquakes?
  5. What are the characteristics of earthquakes?

Tropical storms-

  1. What are tropical storms?
  2. Where do you find tropical storms?
  3. How do you measure tropical storms?
  4. What are the characteristics of tropical storms?

Hazards general-

  1. What are primary and secondary impacts of hazards?
  2. What are economic, environmental and social impacts of hazards?
  3. Why do people live in hazardous areas?
  4. What can be done to limit the impact of the hazards for people who live in hazardous areas?
Biology

Year 10 Revision

Biology
Chemistry

Year 10 Revision

Topic CGP

Revision guide

CGP

Workbook

Chemistry for you
Year 9 Topics
Basic concepts
1.      States of matter 2 4 19
2.      Movement of particles 3 5 18 & 20-21
3.      Elements compounds and mixtures 8 10 24
4.      Separating techniques 8-11 11-13 27-29
Atomic structure and bonding
5.      Atoms, 6 8 22 & 36-42
6.      Isotopes and relative atomic mass 7 9 44-45
7.      The periodic table and electronic structure 13-15 14-16 112-113 & 130-131
8.      Ionic bonding 16-17 17 76-79
9.      Covalent bonding 18-19 20-21 84-85
Crude oil
10.  Organic compounds 67 Not alcohols, carboxylic acids, esters 73 -74 (not Q2, 5 & 6)

75

11.  Naming organic compounds 68
12.  Isomers 69
13.  Crude oil 70 76 214-216
14.  Cracking 71 77 218
15.  Burning hydrocarbons 72 78-79 217
16.  Carbon dioxide 40 45 339-341
17.  Alkanes 73 80 211
18.  Alkenes 74 81 219
Metals
19.  Reactions of metals 41 46-47
20.  The reactivity series 42 48-49 138, 144-145
21.  Iron 43 50 148-151
22.  Metals and redox 44 51 139-141
Year 10 Topics
Chemical calculations
23.  Balancing equations 23 24-25 30-35
24.  Relative formula mass 24 26 46
25.  Moles 25 27-28 48-49
26.  Calculating masses in reactions 26 29-31 58-59 & 65
27.  Empirical an molecular formulae 27 32 54
28.  Finding formulae using experiments 28 33 55
29.  Water of crystallisation 29 34
Structure and properties
30.  Ionic compounds 17 18-19 80-81
31.  Covalent compounds 20 22 86-87, 92-93
32.  Electrical conductivity 21 Not metallic bonding 23 Not metallic bonding
33.  Electrolysis 32 37 154-160
Gases in the atmosphere and chemical tests
34.  Gases in the atmosphere 38 43 330
35.  Gases in reactions 39 44 332
36.  Testing for cations 51 58 370-371 & 376
37.  Testing for anions 52 59 368-369 & 376
38.  Tests for gases and water 60 376
Acids, bases and salts
39.  Acids and alkalis 46 53 196-197
40.  Moles and concentration 30 35 52-53
41.  Reactions of acids 47 54 198-201
42.  Rules of solubility 49 Not making insoluble salts 56 (Q1 only)
43.  Making soluble salts 50 57 198-201
Energy (part of the energy rates and equilibrium target sheets)
44.  Energy transfer 55 61 254, 256 & 258- 259
45.  Measuring enthalpy changes 56 62 257
46.  Calculating enthalpy changes 57 63 255

 

 

Computer Science

Revision List for summer examination 2019

Section A

Input & Output devices

Storage Devices

Binary to Denary Conversion

Denary to Binary Conversion

Hexadecimal conversion

Logic Gates

Internet principles

Computer Architecture

Compression

Communication methods and error detection

 

Section B

Pre-release task type questions

Pseudocode – Algorithm writing

Error detection in code

Databases

Design & Technology

‘Principles of Design & Technology’ Yr10 Exam

REVISION LIST

Materials & Manufacturing (Easter Holiday Revision):

Refer to the mini projects we have designed and made this year, together with the Powerpoint you created for each material group. Revise the types, properties  and available forms of materials, together with the associated manufacturing and joining methods, from the following categories:

  • Polymers *
  • Metals *
  • Timbers
  • Textiles/Fabrics
  • Papers, Card & Printing (Post Easter Holiday)

* Revise in depth

Analysing Existing Products:

Analyse at least two products that are mainly made from materials in the ‘Metals’ category.

What are they made of? How have they been manufactured? How have they been put together and constructed? What is their function? What are the products noticeable features? What are the important safety aspects of the design? Can you relate the aesthetics to a current style?

Generic Design Factors (Post Easter Holiday Revision):

  • Sustainability in Design – social, environmental & economic issues.
  • Ergonomics & Anthropometrics.
  • Computer Aided Design ‘CAD’ & Computer Aided Manufacturing ‘CAM’.

Exam Resource Page (Post Easter Holiday Revision):

Read the exam information/insert page (below) appropriate to your chosen ‘in-depth’ knowledge of materials - Product 5  ‘Toilet Sign’ (metals)

Prepare to write and sketch a step by step plan to explain the stages that you would take if you were making the final product in the school workshop. Use a simple ‘Step by Step’ approach to describe the making process – Marking Out, Cutting, Forming, Joining & Finishing.

You will need to comment on specific materials and components, processes and techniques and tools, including digital technology. How would you gain accuracy over the making? How would you ‘finish’ the product?

Food and Nutrition

Revision list for Yr 10 GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition Summative Examination

Using your text books, online resources and your notes, please revise the following topics in preparation for your final Yr 10 exam.

  • Different types of vegetarianism
  • Macronutrients- Protein, Fats and Carbohydrates- their role and function in our diet.

Micronutrients needed for good dental health

  • Know the differences between saturated and unsaturated fats
  • The role of fibre- know the difference between soluble and insoluble fibre.
  • Read up on Osteoporosis, CHD and coeliac disease
  • Micronutrients- particularly all vitamins- know the chemical names, functions, sources and problems associated with excessive or inadequate vitamin intake.
  • Revise minerals- Iodine and Iron
  • Role of water in the diet
  • Be able to discuss dental health in young children
  • Nutritional needs at different life stages, particularly - Adolescence, Elderly and

Coronary Heart Disease.

  • Heat transfer- Convection, Conduction and Radiation.
  • Know how proteins can be denatured
  • Be able to describe the changes that take place when frying/poaching an egg.
  • Be able to explain Gelatinisation.
  • Functions of eggs in food preparation
  • Know the factors that contribute to childhood obesity

Be able to explain the possible reasons for faults in choux pastry.

  • Be able to explain how an unhealthy diet in childhood may put future health at risk.
  • Read up on food provenance and how to avoid food wastage.
  • Be able to explain how a temperature probe is used to ensure that cooked foods are safe to eat.

 

French

Year 10 French Revision 2019

The Year 10 exam will be a full GCSE experience, including:

Paper 1 (Listening) – 45 minutes

Paper 2 (Speaking) – 10 minutes, including role play, photo task and general conversation

Paper 3 (Reading) – 1 hour, including translation from French to English

Paper 4 (Writing) – 1 hour 15 mins, including translation from English to French

There are many resources available on www.kerboodle.com, an online platform which links to the text book used in class. Log in as follows:

  1. Mary Smith

Username: msmith

Password: msmith

Institution code: pb2

Listening

This will be a full GCSE listening paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from all units

Me, my family and friends

Technology in everyday life

Free time activities

Customs and festivals

Home, town, neighbourhood and region

Travel and tourism

Listening skills practice www.kerboodle.com - you will find many listening exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class.

French radio

BBC bitesize

 

Reading

This will be a full GCSE reading paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from all units

As above

Reading skills practice www.kerboodle.com - you will find many reading exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class

French news articles online (eg. yahoo.fr)

BBC bitesize

Translation practice Review articles from units covered so far. Practise translating sections into English

 

Writing

This will be a GCSE paper, including writing tasks and a translation into French

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from units 1-5 & 8

As above

LADRO Link words

Adjectives

Giving and justifying opinions

Grammar revision Use www.languagesonline.org.uk to practise grammar topics

 

Your knowledge of the following tenses should be secure:

Present tense

Passé composé

Future (proche and/or simple)

 

When you are confident with these tenses, look at:

Imperfect

Conditional

 

You may also look at complex structures, such as:

Si clauses

Après avoir

En + present participle

Subjunctive examples

See 32 points sheet for additional ideas

 

Review also:

Adjective agreements

Negative structures

Comparatives and superlatives

Object pronouns

 

Speaking - You will only be tested on Units 1 - 5

Role play Revise role play phrases in handbook

Look through role plays in text book

See kerboodle for example role plays

Photo card See photo card phrases in handbook

Review topic vocab from units 1-5

General conversation Revision based on speaking questions prepared for units 1-5
Accuracy Revision of grammar points for the writing paper will also support your revision for the speaking

 

Geography
History - Health and the People

Shaping the Nation: Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day

Students will study the importance of the following factors:

• war

• superstition and religion

• chance

• government

 

• communication

• science and technology

• the role of the individual in encouraging or inhibiting change.

 

This option focuses on the following questions:

  • Why has there been progress in the health of the British people?
  • How and why has the pace and scale of medical development varied at different times?
  • What impact has medical progress had on people and society?
  • How and why have different factors been more important than others for individual medical

developments?

  • What is the significance of key individuals or events in the history of medical development?

 

Part one: Medicine stands still
Medieval medicine:

·       approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments

·        the medieval doctor

·        training, beliefs about cause of illness.

Notes? Revised?
 Medical progress:

·       the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment;

·       hospitals

·       the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery

·       surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques.

 

Public health in the Middle Ages:

·       towns and monasteries

·       the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention.

Part two: The beginnings of change
The impact of the Renaissance on Britain:

·       challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery

·       the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey

·       opposition to change

Notes? Revised?
Dealing with disease:

·       traditional and new methods of treatments

·       quackery

·       methods of treating disease

·        plague

·       the growth of hospitals

·       changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians

·       the work of John Hunter.

Prevention of disease:

·       inoculation

·       Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.

Part three: A revolution in medicine
The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain:

·       The importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting;

·       Pasteur and vaccination;

·        Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets

·       everyday medical treatments and remedies

 

Notes? Revised?
A revolution in surgery:

·       anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform

·       antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures

·       aseptic surgery

 

Improvements in public health:

·       public health problems in industrial Britain

·       cholera epidemics

·       the role of public health reformers

·       local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts

 

Part four: Modern medicine
 Modern treatment of disease:

·       the development of the pharmaceutical industry

·       penicillin, its discovery by Fleming, its development

·       new diseases and treatments, antibiotic resistance

·       alternative treatments.

 

Notes? Revised?
The impact of war and technology on surgery:

·       plastic surgery

·       blood transfusions

·       X-rays

·       transplant surgery

·       modern surgical methods, including lasers, radiation therapy and keyhole surgery

 

Modern public health:

·       the importance of Booth, Rowntree, and the Boer War

·       the Liberal social reforms

·       the impact of two world wars on public health, poverty and housing

·        the Beveridge Report and the Welfare State; creation and development of the National Health Service

·       costs, choices and the issues of healthcare in the 21st century

 

 

  • How useful is source…?

Source will be written or visual. Students will need to use the content, provenance and their contextual knowledge in order to evaluate the usefulness of the source. It will target a key event, development, individual or group. Useful/Limitations/Provenance [8 marks] 10 mins

2) Explain the significance of...

It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and specifically assesses the concept of significance. Significance looks at the importance of a key event, person/group or development at the time and importance over time. You must reference two aspects of significance such as short term/ long term, correctness, longevity, impact, consequences. [8 marks] 10 mins

3) Compare... In what ways are they similar?

Must show detailed analysis of BOTH events/people/periods and be able to directly compare based on two or more elements of similarity. Use specific detail to help. [8 marks] 10 mins

4) Essay question using factors; Judgment on relative importance of an event/person against other factors.

Must show balanced explanation and supported evaluation.  It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and developments over time. It will ask students to evaluate one stated factor against other factors. Factors could include war, religion, chance, government, communication, science and technology or the role of an individual. This will be an essay question requiring a judgement. It is an extended response which requires you to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning which is coherent, relevant, substantiated and logically structured. Marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) will also be available. Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc. [16 marks] + 4 SPaG  25 minutes

History - American West

Understanding the modern world:  1A America, 1840–1895: Expansion and consolidation

This period study focuses on the development of America during a turbulent half century of change.

It was a period of expansion and consolidation – the expansion to the west and consolidation of the

United States as a nation.

Part one: Expansion: opportunities and challenges
The geography of North America:

·       attitudes to the Great American Desert

·       the belief in ‘Manifest Destiny’

 

Notes? Revised?
Why the early settlers went west and the challenges they faced:

·       Brigham Young and the Mormons

·        the pioneer migrant farmers, the journey west

·       the miners.

 

Dealing with a different culture:

·       the Plains Indians’ way of life;

·       early American Government policy towards the Plains Indians;

·       the Permanent Indian Frontier;

·        a changing relationship with the Plains Indians.

 

Part two: Conflict across America
Increasing conflict on the Plains:

·       the Fort Laramie Treaty (1851) and the failure of the policy of concentration;

·       the Indian Wars (1862–1867): reasons for and consequences of the Wars;

·       Sand Creek Massacre;

·       Fetterman's Trap.

 

Notes? Revised?
The background to the American Civil War:

·       differences between North and South, issues of slavery, westward expansion and free states abolitionism;

·       breakdown of the Missouri Compromise, John Brown, the roles of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis

·        the social and economic impact of the American Civil War on civilian populations

 

Coming to terms with the Mormons:

·       the Mountain Meadow Massacre and its aftermath.

Part three: Consolidation: forging the nation
The aftermath of the American Civil War:

·       the 13th Amendment

·       Civil Rights Act

·       reconstruction in the South, 1866–1877

·       carpetbaggers

·       the balance of Federal and State powers

Notes? Revised?
The continued settlement of the west:

·       the Homesteaders, reasons for going west; government actions and laws

·       land and railroads

·       farming problems and solutions

 

The resolution of ‘the Indian problem’ after 1865:

·       the small reservations policy; attitudes to the native Americans

·       Battle of the Little Big Horn

·       The Dawes Act

·       Battle of Wounded Knee

·       The closing of the frontier and its impact on native Americans.

 

 

1) How do interpretations differ?

Recognition of contrasting inferences. ‘Source A suggested’ ‘whereas Source B suggests ’supported by specific examples from source content. [4 marks] 4 mins

2) Why do interpretations differ?

Analysis of why inferences contrast.  Must have reference to BOTH provenance AND one other method of evaluation (audience, purpose, time, place, experience/knowledge of events, beliefs, circumstances etc.) [4 marks] 4 mins

3) How convincing are interpretations?

Judgment on which inference is more convincing.  Provides support for BOTH sides based on knowledge of the period with supported judgement on which is better. Use sources and own knowledge. [8 marks] 12 mins

4) Describe….

This requires a description of two key features or characteristics of the period studied. Needs support from specific knowledge. [4 marks] 4 mins

5) In what ways... Explain your Answer

Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the period studied using specific knowledge. This requires a complex explanation of one of the following: causes, consequences, similarities, differences, changes, continuity or significance. [8 marks] 12 mins

6) Essay Question

A comparative analysis of two events/people/factors etc. Must show detailed analysis of BOTH events and be able to reach sustained judgment on significance based on links AND relative importance.  Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc. [12 marks] 18 mins

Italian

The Year 10 exam will be a full GCSE experience, including:

  • Paper 1 (Listening) – approx. 45 minutes (to take place in normal lesson time before exam week)
  • Paper 2 (Speaking) – approx. 10 minutes, including role play, photo task and general conversation (to take place outside of exam week)
  • Paper 3 (Reading) – 1 hour, including translation from Italian to English
  • Paper 4 (Writing) – 1 hour 15 mins, including translation from English to Italian

Listening

Exam during week beginning 14th May

This will be a full GCSE listening paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Reading

Exam during exam week

This will be a full GCSE reading paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills. This will also include a translation into English.

Writing

Exam during exam week

This will be a GCSE paper, including writing tasks and a translation into Italian

  • The three questions will be:
    • 16 mark task- spend approx. 15-20 mins on this
    • 32 mark question – spend approx. 35-40 mins on this
    • Translation – spend approx. 10-15 minutes on this

Speaking

  • You will get 12 minutes preparation time to prepare a role play and a speaking card
  • You should revise your Role Play and Speaking Card vocabulary sheets
  • The exam format will look like this:
    • Begin with Role play
    • Discuss Photo task (up to 3 mins)
    • General Conversation (approx. 5 mins)

General areas to review:

  • Vocabulary from the topics covered so far (family/ relationships / free time / health / school/ customs)
  • Success criteria for the exams
  • The 32 points sheet for complex language
  • The different tenses (in order to score maximum marks you will need to include three time frames)
  • Listening and Reading skills (see resources list on where to practice)
  • Any past writing tasks you have done and the feedback from it

Resource List:

Listening and Reading papers:

Grammar and vocabulary:

Youtube resources:

Maths
Physical Education

YEAR 10 REVISION LIST ~ GCSE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The human body and movement in physical activity and sport

  • Skeleton and Joints
    • What does our skeleton do?
    • Types of joint – names.
    • What type of movement occurs at each joint?
    • Which bones are located at each joint?
    • How to label a synovial joint?
  • Bones
    • Names
  • Muscles
    • How do our muscles work together with bones to produce movement?
    • How are our muscles attached to our bones?
    • How do our muscles work in pairs?
    • Define an agonist muscle.
    • Define an antagonist.
    • Types of muscle contractions.
  • The Cardiovascular System
    • Know how to label the heart.
    • Pathway of blood.
    • How can we calculate our maximal heart rate?
    • Redistribution of blood during exercise.
  • The Respiratory System
    • What is gaseous exchange?
    • Explain tidal volume.
    • Explain residual volume.
    • Aerobic and anaerobic energy systems.
    • EPOC
  • The effects of exercise
    • Short term.
    • Long term.
  • Movement Analysis – levers, planes and axes
    • Practice drawing the 3 lever diagrams.
    • What is the equation that works out the mechanical advantage?
    • What are the 3 planes of motion?
    • What are the 3 axes of rotation?
  • Components of Fitness
    • Can you name all ten?
    • Why are they important?
  • Fitness Testing
    • Why do we carry out fitness testing?
    • What test measures each component of fitness?
    • Limitations of fitness testing.
  • Types of Training
    • Why are they important to performers for their activity?
    • Training thresholds / zones.
    • High altitude training – why is it effective?
  • Training Seasons
    • Name and know all three.

Good Luck in your exams.

Mrs McAnuff / Mrs Mountford

Physics
RS
Spanish

The Year 10 exam will be a full GCSE experience, including:

Paper 1 (Listening) – 45 minutes

Paper 2 (Speaking) – 10 minutes, including role play, photo task and general conversation

Paper 3 (Reading) – 1 hour, including translation from Spanish to English

Paper 4 (Writing) – 1 hour 15 mins, including translation from English to Spanish

There are many resources available on www.kerboodle.com, an online platform which links to the text book used in class. Log in as follows:

  1. Mary Smith

Username: msmith

Password: msmith

Institution code: pb2

 

Listening

This will be a full GCSE listening paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these yet in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills. *You can look further ahead at Y11 topics not yet studied, but you may wish to focus on those that we have so far.

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from all units

Me, my family and friends

Technology in everyday life

Free time activities

Customs and festivals

Home, town, neighbourhood and region

Travel and tourism

Listening skills practice www.kerboodle.com - you will find many listening exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class.

Spanish radio

BBC bitesize

Use the Higher – Reading and Listening sections at the end of each unit in the textbook for further practice.

 

Reading

This will be a full GCSE reading paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills. *You can look further ahead at Y11 topics not yet studied, but you may wish to focus on those that we have so far.

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from all units

As above

Reading skills practice www.kerboodle.com - you will find many reading exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class

Spanish news articles online (eg. https://elpais.com/ )

BBC bitesize

Use the Higher – Reading and Listening sections at the end of each unit in the textbook for further practice.

Translation practice Review articles from units covered so far. Practise translating sections into English

Use the Higher – Reading and Listening sections at the end of each unit in the textbook for further practice.

 

Writing

This will be a GCSE paper, including writing tasks and a translation into Spanish

Topic vocabulary Revise vocabulary from units 1-5

As above

LADRO Link words

Adjectives

Giving and justifying opinions

Grammar revision Use www.languagesonline.org.uk to practise grammar topics

https://conjuguemos.com/activities/spanish/verb/1 for Spanish verb tense practice

 

Your knowledge of the following tenses should be secure:

Present tense (including popular irregular verbs) (Unit 1)

Immediate Future tense (Unit 1)

Perfect tense (Past) (Unit 2)

Estar and the Present continuous tense (Unit 2)

The Future tense (Unit 3)

The Preterite tense (Past) (+ irregular) (Unit 4)

The Imperfect tense (+ irregular) (Unit 4)

 

When you are confident with these tenses, look ahead at:

Conditional (the ‘would’ tense)

 

You may also look at including complex structures, to advance your writing. Please see relevant document (SMH).

 

Review also:

Adjective agreements

Negative structures

Comparatives and superlatives

Object pronouns

Question words

False friends

 

Speaking - You will only be tested on Units 1 - 5

Role play Revise role play phrases from relevant document (SMH)

Look through role plays in text book at the end of each unit

See Kerboodle for further example role plays

Photo card See photo card phrases relevant document in folder (+SMH)

Review topic vocab from Units 1-5 from the text book at the end of each unit

General conversation Revision based on speaking questions you have prepared for Units 1-5
Accuracy Revision of grammar points for the writing paper will also support your revision for the speaking